US Army

Food for Thought... About Nutrition, Performance, Resiliency and Recovery

Eating nutritious foods is good for us physically. But can nutrition affect our psychological health? Can what a person eats affect their mood? The military is actually very interested in nutrition—in fact, the topic is one of the Military Health System’s themes for March. Good nutrition can maximize a service member’s level of performance, improve their resiliency and play a role in medical recovery—and keeping their families healthy supports them as well.

If I Talk to a Psychologist, Will They Take Away My Gun?

The cheerful young man in Chicago’s O’Hare airport wore a cowboy hat and was dressed in long, baggy denim shorts despite the chilly November evening. His chin was flecked with blond stubble, tattoos covered both forearms, and a plug sagged in his earlobe. He looked to be in his early twenties. While we waited for our flight to Seattle, we chatted. Or mostly, I listened.

Get Fit for the APFT. Get Fit for Life.

This April, Guard Your Health will launch FitText, an optional text-messaging initiative centered on preparing for the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and supporting overall fitness among Army National Guard (ARNG) soldiers and their families.

When does FitText begin?

Beginning on April 15, FitText is designed to help soldiers make plans to get fit before the upcoming warm weather months.

Who runs FitText?

Guard Your Health, a campaign out of the Army National Guard Chief Surgeon’s Office, is launching the FitText initiative.

Secretary of the Army John McHugh Visits T2 and Kicks the Tires

One of the challenges of developing innovative military health applications is trying to anticipate what will appeal to both the boots on the ground and senior leaders. Here at the National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2), we coordinate frequent focus groups and several studies to help keep current with service member needs.

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