mobile apps

How Mobile Apps Can Help With Your Therapy

If you're receiving counseling, at some point your health care provider may ask you to consider using a mobile app to help with your therapy. Amanda Edwards-Stewart, the program lead for innovations at the Defense Department’s National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2), is also a board-certified clinical psychologist who uses apps with military patients. She sat down with us to share why she thinks mobile apps can be helpful, and how they can help people manage challenges like anxiety, anger and depression.

Balancing Efficiency and Efficacy in a Doctor Visit

Mobile apps are the newest tool in a health care provider’s toolbox to encourage patient self-care and health management. Earlier this year, I worked with an active-duty family physician in a primary care clinic on Joint Base Lewis-McChord to pilot a process for prescribing a sleep app during a patient visit. The project included mapping a patient visit workflow, training staff on the mobile app, and developing patient handouts and provider guides.

What People Say About T2's Provider Resilience App

Nothing’s more persuasive than a review from someone who’s actually used a product. Here at T2, we welcome comments from those who use our free psychological health apps, even to let us know that a feature doesn’t work right or that a new update made their data vanish (oops—sorry!). We need that type of information so we can fix things and make our products better. But we love hearing about when things work, and when our apps help people’s lives. This week we continue a series of blogs featuring what people like about T2’s apps.

Pokemon GO: An Annoying Win for Mental Health

As both a psychologist and a gamer, I’m thrilled with the success of the mobile app Pokemon GO, the location-based, augmented reality game where players use their smartphones to locate virtual Pokemon characters in real-world locations. I’m guessing that you’re either playing the game yourself or have run across players. And I mean that literally: the game can be so absorbing that players walk into pedestrians, crash into police cars and have even been robbed. Sounds annoying, right?

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