Ms. Cathy McDonald

Cathy McDonald is the Staff Writer for the National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2).

The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Center for Telehealth & Technology, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

 

Take Back Your Night

I’ve had trouble getting to sleep. And I’ve had nightmares. But I’ve never been afraid to go to sleep because of chronic nightmares, like some service members and vets and others exposed to trauma. Those kinds of nightmares often replay the actual events that were experienced, rather than more hypothetical scenarios, so they seem even more real.

If I Talk to a Psychologist, Will They Take Away My Gun?

The cheerful young man in Chicago’s O’Hare airport wore a cowboy hat and was dressed in long, baggy denim shorts despite the chilly November evening. His chin was flecked with blond stubble, tattoos covered both forearms, and a plug sagged in his earlobe. He looked to be in his early twenties. While we waited for our flight to Seattle, we chatted. Or mostly, I listened.

Free T2 Resources for Educators Help Military Kids at School

Kids in school want to make friends, be liked by their teachers (or just stay out of trouble) and kind of know what’s going on in their classes. They really just want to fit in. But for military kids, that can be hard to do. They move often. Families get separated by deployments. And many kids have to adjust to parents returning home with physical or behavioral health issues. These kids are a minority from a very different culture—the military culture--so very few people (if anyone) understand what their lives are really like.

Raise Awareness to Lower the Risk of Brain Injury

DVBIC A Head for the Future Banner

Few people think about traumatic brain injury (TBI) unless they have one or know someone with one. Sure, you’ve heard about people getting TBIs during deployment in a war zone. But surprisingly, the vast majority of TBIs in the military are actually diagnosed in noncombat settings such as motorcycle or car crashes, falls and sports-related incidents. Since 2000, more than 320,000 service members have been diagnosed with a TBI. And concussions — actually considered a mild form of brain injury — are the most common type.

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