Dr. Larry Pruitt

Larry Pruitt, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist and the program supervisor for the DoD Suicide Event Report (DoDSER) program at the National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2)

The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Center for Telehealth & Technology, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

 

Learning from Tragedy, Part 2: Why, How Suicide Happens

This three-part series describes the Department of Defense Suicide Event Report (DoDSER) system that collects and analyzes data on U.S. military deaths by suicide, as well as data on suicide attempts. The National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2) compiles these data into an annual report for military leadership that is available to the public. The first blog in the series described how the DoDSER system was established; this blog describes the type of data collected about military suicides and suicide attempts.

Learning from Tragedy, Part 1: Tracking Suicide in the U.S. Military

This three-part series describes the Department of Defense Suicide Event Report (DoDSER) system that collects and analyzes data on U.S. military deaths by suicide, as well as data on suicide attempts. The National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2) compiles these data into an annual report for military leadership that is available to the public. This initial blog describes how the DoDSER came to exist.

As a Psychologist, I Can't Take Away Your Gun

One of our December blogs described a young vet who said he would be reluctant to talk to a psychologist because he feared his gun would be taken away. To present the provider’s side of this story is one of T2’s psychologists.

Bringing Behavioral Health Home

One of the biggest risks to your behavioral health is putting off treatment that could not only get you feeling better sooner, but also save your relationships, your career, and ultimately, your life. There are a lot of reasons we put off taking care of ourselves. Some things are out of our control (for example, needing to see a specialist in a city that is two hours away), and others are the result of the very thing we’re trying to get help with (such as not wanting to talk about difficult, personal topics).

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