Dr. Christina Armstrong

Christina Armstrong, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist and the Program Lead for the Education & Training Program at the National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2).

The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Center for Telehealth & Technology, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

Mobile Health Research Highlight: CABITs, TRICKs and HIVAS, Oh my!

In the last Mobile Health Research Highlight we examined theory-driven mHealth research. This week we highlight three new studies evaluating mHealth interventions, as well as talk about another trend in mHealth research: the widespread use of clever acronyms. While the use of acronyms isn’t a new phenomenon (I work for the military and can hear whole sentences of only acronyms), it seems like every new mHealth intervention has a creative nickname. I’ll break down the latest in mHealth acronyms:

Mobile Health Research Highlight: Theory-driven mHealth

Traditional health care interventions are based on theory, which helps guide the development and evaluation of those interventions. One weakness in mHealth is the lack of theory to drive the rise of innovative technology-based interventions. The next step in the development of mHealth is to use theory to drive the development and evaluation of interventions.

Clinician Resistance to Technology in Behavioral Health Therapy

Behavioral health clinicians may be hesitant to introduce technological options into therapy for many reasons. They may connect the use of some new technology, like mobile apps, solely with entertainment purposes such as games (e.g., Angry Birds). They may fear that the addition of a technology may interfere with the building of rapport with their patients. However, the barrier may also lie in a discomfort with how the adoption of a new technology may disrupt the traditional model of therapeutic interaction.

Five Tips for Using Mobile Apps in Therapy

With the explosion of mobile apps on the market, clinicians now have at their fingertips some incredible tools for improving care for their patients. Now, I’m not talking about using Angry Birds in therapy. I’m talking about legitimate, well-made apps that integrate evidence-based practices. But before you rush out and download any old app, here are five tips to help clinicians who want to use apps in therapy:

1. Always put evidence-based practices first.

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