Dr. Christina Armstrong

Christina Armstrong, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist and the Program Lead for the Education & Training Program at the National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2).

The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Center for Telehealth & Technology, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

Educational Workshops Train Military Providers to Integrate Mobile Apps into Clinical Care

As the Education and Training Program lead at Defense Health Agency (DHA) Connected Health, I get a lot of questions from providers about what to expect from one of our mobile health training workshops. My answer? You’ll get a ton of great information on integrating mobile health applications into your clinical care, including what you need to know about security, privacy and ethical issues. These workshops are interactive, allowing clinicians to role-play sessions and gain hands-on, practical experience that can be integrated into their clinical care.

Mobile Health Resources Available Online for Military Providers

Picture of Tripler Army Medical Center

Tripler Army Medical Center, located on the beautiful Hawaiian island of Oahu, sprawls atop a lush hill like a pretty pink palace. In December 2016, psychologists from the Defense Department’s National Center of Telehealth & Technology (T2) led 84 military clinicians at Tripler through a one-day workshop on how to integrate mobile health technologies (like mobile apps) into their practices.

Feedback from the attendees included:

Benefit Your Patients‒Add Mobile Tools to Your Practice

In a previous Mobile Health blog, T2’s usability expert Jenn June described how both civilian and military health providers are beginning to embrace mobile technologies to deliver evidence-based psychological health treatment. However, adoption rates remain slow, despite patient requests.

Embracing Technology in Therapy

Working with patients with neurocognitive deficits demands flexibility, creativity and persistence on the part of the clinician. It’s the job of the clinician to understand each patient’s unique set of strengths and weaknesses in the development of a therapy program.

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